search
for
 About Bioline  All Journals  Testimonials  Membership  News  Donations


Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine
Medknow Publications on behalf of the Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine
ISSN: 0972-5229
EISSN: 1998-359x
Vol. 15, No. 4, 2011, pp. 213-223
Bioline Code: cm11060
Full paper language: English
Document type: Research Article
Document available free of charge

Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 15, No. 4, 2011, pp. 213-223

 en Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections in the intensive care unit
Patil, Harsha V.; Patil, Virendra C.; Ramteerthkar, M N. & Kulkarni, R D.

Abstract

Context: Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients.
Aims: This study was conducted to determine the incidence of central venous catheter-related infections (CRIs) and to identify the factors influencing it. So far, there are very few studies that have been conducted on CRBSI in the intensive care unit in India.
Settings and Design: This was a prospective, observational study carried out in the medical intensive care unit (MICU) over a period of 1 year from January to December 2004.
Materials and Methods: A total of 54 patients with indwelling central venous catheters of age group between 20 and 75 years were included. The catheters were cultured using the standard semiquantitative culture (SQC) method. Statistical analysis used SPSS-10 version statistical software.
Results: A total of 54 CVC catheters with 319 catheter days were included in this study. Of 54 patients with CVCs studied for bacteriology, 39 (72.22%) catheters showed negative SQCs and also negative blood cultures. A total of 15 (27.77%) catheters were positive on SQC, of which 10 (18.52%) were with catheter-associated infection and four (7.41%) were with catheter-associated bacteremia; the remaining one was a probable catheter-associated bacteremia. CRIs were high among catheters that were kept in situ for more than 3 days and emergency procedures where two or more attempts were required for catheterization (P < 0.05). In multivariate analysis of covariance duration of catheter in situ for >3 days, inexperienced venupucturist, more number of attempts and emergency CVC were associated with more incidence of CVCBSIs, with P <0.02. The duration of catheter in situ was negatively correlated (-0.53) and number of attempts required to put CVC was positively correlated (+0.39) with incidence of CVCBSIs. Sixty-five percent of the isolates belonged to the CONS group (13/20). Staphylococcus epidermidis check for this species in other resources showed maximum susceptibility to amikacin, doxycycline and amoxycillin with clavulanic acid and was susceptible to vancomycin (100%). Klebsiella pneumoniae check for this species in other resources was 100% susceptible to amikacin and ciprofloxacin. Escherichia coli check for this species in other resources was susceptible to amikacin and cefotaxime.
Conclusions: The overall incidence of CRI was 27.77% (15/54). Catheter-associated BSIs were 47.31 per 1000 catheter-days. CRI was low in the catheters inserted by the experienced venipuncturists, elective procedure and CVC kept in situ for ≤3 days. S. epidermidis was the most common isolate.

Keywords
Catheter-related infection, catheter-associated infection, semiquantitative culture

 
© Copyright 2011 Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine.
Alternative site location: http://www.ijccm.org/

Home Faq Resources Email Bioline
© Bioline International, 1989 - 2020, Site last up-dated on 09-Nov-2020.
Site created and maintained by the Reference Center on Environmental Information, CRIA, Brazil
System hosted by the Internet Data Center of Rede Nacional de Ensino e Pesquisa, RNP, Brazil