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Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management
World Bank assisted National Agricultural Research Project (NARP) - University of Port Harcourt
ISSN: 1119-8362
Vol. 20, No. 2, 2016, pp. 403-406
Bioline Code: ja16049
Full paper language: English
Document type: Research Article
Document available free of charge

Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management, Vol. 20, No. 2, 2016, pp. 403-406

 en Effect of Particulates Generated from Asphalt Production on the Morphological and Leaf Epidermal Traits of some Common Plants
MERCY GOSPEL, AJURU & UPADHI, FRIDAY

Abstract

A comparative study was carried out to ascertain the effects of particulate matter on the gross morphological and leaf epidermal features of some tropical plants. Two populations of Xanthosoma mafaffa check for this species in other resources Schott, Chromolaena odorata check for this species in other resources (L.) King and Robinson, and Ageratum conyzoides check for this species in other resources (L.) were collected; one from an unpolluted area and the other from a polluted environment (generated from an asphalt production industry). Plants from the polluted area show marked reduction in leaf size and area, and reduced chlorophyll content in leaves. There were chlorotic and necrotic leaf spots on the species from polluted area and an average leaf area of 94.81 cm2, 15.81 cm2, and 17.29 cm2 for X. mafaffa, C. odorata and A. conyzoides respectively while the non-polluted species had no leaf spots and an average leaf area of 181.95cm2, 36.75 cm2, and 32.11cm2 for X. mafaffa, C. odorata and A. conyzoides respectively. Length and width of stomatal pore of leaves from polluted area had increased number of stomata, but the length and width of stomata were reduced by -12.89% and - 08.42%, -19.54% and -28.60% and -27.50% and -37.86% in the length and width of X. mafaffa, C. odorata and A. conyzoides respectively, as compared to the leaf samples from unpolluted area. Also, epidermal cells decreased compared to the leaves from unpolluted area, while the density of epidermal cells per unit area increased. These suggest that these plants are under air pollution stress and the results are adaptive and compensated mechanism to the adverse effects of the particulate matter.

 
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