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Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Fiocruz
ISSN: 1678-8060
EISSN: 1678-8060
Vol. 102, No. 5, 2007, pp. 559-565
Bioline Code: oc07089
Full paper language: English
Document type: Research Article
Document available free of charge

Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Vol. 102, No. 5, 2007, pp. 559-565

 en Experimental transmission of the parasitic flagellates Trypanosoma cruzi   check for this species in other resources and Trypanosoma rangeli   check for this species in other resources between triatomine bugs or mice and captive neotropical bats
Thomas, Maurice E; Rasweiler IV, John J & D'Alessandro, Antonio

Abstract

Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli-like trypanosomes have been found in a variety of neotropical bat species. In this study, bats (Artibeus lituratus   check for this species in other resources , Carollia perspicillata   check for this species in other resources , Desmodus rotundus   check for this species in other resources , Glossophaga soricina   check for this species in other resources , Molossus molossus   check for this species in other resources , Phyllostomus hastatus   check for this species in other resources ) were maintained under controlled conditions, and experiments were conducted to determine how they might become infected naturally with trypanosomes. All bats were first screened for existing infections by hemoculture and the examination of blood smears, and only apparently uninfected animals were then used in the experiments. Proof was obtained that the triatomine bug Rhodnius prolixus   check for this species in other resources would readily feed upon some of the bats, and two species became infected after being bitten by bugs infected with T. rangeli. Some bats also became infected by ingesting R. prolixus carrying T. cruzi, or following subcutaneous or intragastic inoculation with fecal suspensions of R. prolixus containing T. cruzi. P. hastatus became infected after ingesting mice carrying T. cruzi. All of the bats studied inhabit roosts that may be occupied by triatomine bugs and, with the exception of D. rotundus, all also feed to at least some extent upon insects. These findings provide further evidence of how bats may play significant roles in the epidemiology of T. cruzi and T. rangeli in the New World tropics.

Keywords
Trypanosoma cruzi - Trypanosoma rangeli - triatomines - neotropical bats - Chagas disease

 
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