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Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Fiocruz
ISSN: 1678-8060
EISSN: 1678-8060
Vol. 104, No. 5, 2009, pp. 724-727
Bioline Code: oc09162
Full paper language: English
Document type: Research Article
Document available free of charge

Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Vol. 104, No. 5, 2009, pp. 724-727

 en Blastocystis check for this species in other resources subtypes in irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease in Ankara, Turkey
Dogruman-Al, Funda; Kustimur, Semra; Yoshikawa, Hisao; Tuncer, Candan; Simsek, Zahide; Tanyuksel, Mehmet; Araz, Engin & Boorom, Kenneth

Abstract

Blastocystis check for this species in other resources infection has been reported to be associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and chronic diarrhoea. The availability of data on the subtypes of Blastocystis found in these patient groups would be of interest in understanding the significance of Blastocystis infection in chronic illness. In this study, we identify Blastocystis subtypes found in patients presenting with IBS, IBD, chronic diarrhoea and asymptomatic patients in Ankara, Turkey. Blastocystis was detected in 11 symptomatic patients by microscopy and 19 by stool culture. Stool culture was more sensitive than microscopy in identifying Blastocystis. Using standard nomenclature adopted in 2007, Blastocystis sp. subtype 3 was the most common in all groups, followed by Blastocystis sp. subtype 2. Identical subtypes of Blastocystis are found in patients with IBS, IBD and chronic diarrhoea. These particular subtypes show low host specificity and are carried by humans and some farm animals. The subtypes of Blastocystis that are commonly found in rodents and certain wild birds were not found in these patients. We suggest a model in which the severity of enteric protozoan infection may be mediated by host factors.

Keywords
Blastocystis hominis - subtyping - chronic diarrhoea - irritable bowel syndrome - inflammatory bowel disease - pathogenicity

 
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