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International Journal of Environment Science and Technology
Center for Environment and Energy Research and Studies (CEERS)
ISSN: 1735-1472
EISSN: 1735-2630
Vol. 2, No. 3, 2005-2006, pp. 193-199
Bioline Code: st05026
Full paper language: English
Document type: Research Article
Document available free of charge

International Journal of Environment Science and Technology, Vol. 2, No. 3, 2005-2006, pp. 193-199

 en Spatial pattern of variation in populations of Acacia nilotica check for this species in other resources in semi-arid environment
S. Mahmood, A. Ahmed, A. Hussain and M. Athar

Abstract

Variability among populations was analyzed in five provenances of Acacia nilotica check for this species in other resources from spatially variable habitats. Populations of A. nilotica developed in response to their habitat conditions. The level of variability was significantly high among the populations. Phenotypic variability was extremely high for leaf and stipular spine characteristics. The nature of morphological variability for vegetative traits appeared environmentally controlled. The differentiation of leaf and stipular spine expression seems to have an adaptive significance for the species in terms of water economy. Although, seed and podcharacteristics are geneticallycontrolled showing a lower proportion of variability but thesetraits supported r and k-selection that may allow the species to survive under a wide array of contrasting habitats. The study suggested that populations of A. nilotica are differentiated in relation to the heterogeneity of environment. These populations became adapted to their habitat through the variability of morphological expressions. The morphologically differentiated populations of the species had allowed them to maintain themselves in a wide array of environmental situations enabling A. nilotica to occupy ample ecological ranges.

Keywords
Acacia nilotica, spatial pattern, population variation, environmental adaptations

 
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