search
for
 About Bioline  All Journals  Testimonials  Membership  News  Donations


International Journal of Environment Science and Technology
Center for Environment and Energy Research and Studies (CEERS)
ISSN: 1735-1472
EISSN: 1735-2630
Vol. 10, No. 1, 2013, pp. 1-10
Bioline Code: st13001
Full paper language: English
Document type: Research Article
Document available free of charge

International Journal of Environment Science and Technology, Vol. 10, No. 1, 2013, pp. 1-10

 en Inorganic arsenic sorption by drinking-water treatment residual-amended sandy soil: effect of soil solution chemistry
Nagar, R.; Sarkar, D.; Makris, K.C. & Datta, R.

Abstract

Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that drinking-water treatment residuals are effective sorbents of arsenic V. However, the effect of soil solution chemistry on arsenic V sorption by drinking-water treatment residuals-amended soils remains to be explored. The current study uses a batch incubation experimental set up to evaluate the effect of soil solution pH, competing ligands, and complexing metal on arsenic V sorption by a sandy soil (Immokalee series) amended with two rates (25 and 50 g kg-1) of aluminum and iron-based drinking-water treatment residuals. Experiments were conducted at three initial arsenic loads (125, 1,875, 3,750 mg kg-1) and a constant solid: solution ratio of 200 g L-1. An optimum equilibration time of 8 days, obtained from kinetic studies, was utilized for sorption experiments with both aluminum and iron drinking-water treatment residual-amended soil. Presence of phosphate decreased arsenic V sorption by both aluminum and iron drinking-water treatment residual amended soils, with a strong dependence on pH, drinking-water treatment residual types, drinking-water treatment residual application rates, and phosphate concentrations. Addition of sulfate had no effect on arsenic V sorption by aluminum or iron drinking-water treatment residual-amended soil. A complementing effect of calcium on arsenic V sorption was observed at higher pH. Results elucidating the effect of soil solution chemistry on the arsenic V sorption will be helpful in calibrating drinking-water treatment residual as a sorbent for remediation of arsenic-contaminated soils.

Keywords
Arsenic; Drinking-water treatment residuals; Batch incubation; Remediation; Sorption

 
© 2013 - Center for Environment and Energy Research and Studies (CEERS)
Alternative site location: http://www.ijest.org

Home Faq Resources Email Bioline
© Bioline International, 1989 - 2017, Site last up-dated on 05-Dec-2017.
Site created and maintained by the Reference Center on Environmental Information, CRIA, Brazil
System hosted by the Internet Data Center of Rede Nacional de Ensino e Pesquisa, RNP, Brazil