search
for
 About Bioline  All Journals  Testimonials  Membership  News  Donations


International Journal of Environment Science and Technology
Center for Environment and Energy Research and Studies (CEERS)
ISSN: 1735-1472
EISSN: 1735-2630
Vol. 11, No. 1, 2014, pp. 97-110
Bioline Code: st14011
Full paper language: English
Document type: Research Article
Document available free of charge

International Journal of Environment Science and Technology, Vol. 11, No. 1, 2014, pp. 97-110

 en Exposure to ionising radiations arising from the operation of nuclear installations and cancer mortality
López-Abente, G.; Vidal-Ocabo, E.; Tello-Anchuela, O.; Aragonés, N.; García-Pérez, J.; Pastor-Barriuso, R.; Pérez-Gómez, B.; Jiménez, M. A.; Martín-Valdepeñas, J. M.; García-Talavera, M.; Ramos, L. & Pollán, M

Abstract

World-wide controversy continues to surround the question of whether exposure to ionising radiations arising from nuclear power plants and radioactive fuel cycle facilities could increase the risk of cancer. The objective was to analyse cancer mortality in towns close to Spanish nuclear power plants and radioactive fuel cycle facilities by reference to their history of exposure to artificial radiation generated by such emissions. An ecological cancer mortality study was conducted to know the effect of artificial radiation, estimated taken into account the magnitude of emissions, in towns ≤30 km of any installation. A model of atmospheric and aquatic dispersion of radionuclides was used. As reference, towns within a 50–100 km radius were matched with exposed by socio-demographic characteristics. For analysis purposes, log-linear Poisson models were fitted. The cumulative effective dose was the measure of exposure. Mortality rates ratios were calculated for each tumour site. Natural radiation and socio-demographic matching variables were included in the models, with ‘installation’ as a random effects term. The estimated cumulative artificial radiation dose was below 350 μSv for all sites. For nuclear power plants overall, analysis showed no positive association with increases in the cumulative dose. In the joint analysis of radioactive fuel cycle facilities, however, mortality was observed to rise with increases in the estimated radiation dose in the case of lung, bone and colorectal cancer, and in breast cancer among women. These results would not appear to be due to exposure arising from the operation of the installations, since were not reproduced around installations of the same type.

Keywords
Environmental pollution/prevention and control; Epidemiology; Industrial pollution; Nuclear power; Spatial epidemiology

 
© International Journal of Environment Science and Technology
Alternative site location: http://www.ijest.org

Home Faq Resources Email Bioline
© Bioline International, 1989 - 2017, Site last up-dated on 16-Oct-2017.
Site created and maintained by the Reference Center on Environmental Information, CRIA, Brazil
System hosted by the Internet Data Center of Rede Nacional de Ensino e Pesquisa, RNP, Brazil