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International Journal of Environment Science and Technology
Center for Environment and Energy Research and Studies (CEERS)
ISSN: 1735-1472
EISSN: 1735-2630
Vol. 11, No. 7, 2014, pp. 199-2008
Bioline Code: st14195
Full paper language: English
Document type: Research Article
Document available free of charge

International Journal of Environment Science and Technology, Vol. 11, No. 7, 2014, pp. 199-2008

 en Solvent–water extraction method for the evaluation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons bioavailability in coal–tar-contaminated soils
Lee, P.H.; Chao, K.P. & Ong, S.K.

Abstract

A solvent–water extraction method was proposed as an assessment tool to estimate the bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in coal–tar-contaminated soils. The approach taken was to measure the percent of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons extracted by a solvent– water mixture and comparing the results with the percent of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degraded in a soil slurry reactor. Five soil samples from three former manufactured gas plant sites and a coal–tar disposal site which were operated between 1880 and 1947, and 1945 and 1950, respectively, in Iowa, USA were used in this study. Extraction experiments were conducted using acetone– water or ethanol–water mixtures with solvent volume fractions ranging from 1.0 to 0.4 (v/v). The percent of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons extracted from the various soils decreased as the volume fraction of the solvent in the solvent–water mixture was reduced. An acetone–water mixture of 0.6 was found to be appropriate in correlating the percent of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degraded to the percent of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons extracted. For the first correlation, the percent extracted and the percent biodegraded were modified by using the molecular weights and log Kow of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, respectively. For the second correlation, the equation relating the percent extracted and the percent biodegraded was modified using soil properties such as organic carbon content and percent of clay and silt. Although the experiments were conducted for a limited number of soils, the extraction method appeared to be a good starting point in estimating the bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in coal–tar-contaminated soils.

Keywords
Acetone; Aromatic hydrocarbons; Bioavailability; Solvent

 
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