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African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines
African Ethnomedicines Network
ISSN: 0189-6016
Vol. 13, No. 2, 2016, pp. 176-184
Bioline Code: tc16044
Full paper language: English
Document type: Research Article
Document available free of charge

African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines, Vol. 13, No. 2, 2016, pp. 176-184

 en ANTIVIRAL EFFECTS OF GREEN TEA ( CAMELLIA SINENSIS check for this species in other resources ) AGAINST PATHOGENIC VIRUSES IN HUMAN AND ANIMALS (A MINI-REVIEW)
Mahmood, Muhammad Shahid; Mártinez, José L.; Aslam, Azhar; Rafique, Azhar; Vinet, Raúl; Laurido, Claudio; Hussain, Iftikhar; Abbas, Rao Zahid; Khan, Ahrar & Ali, Shahid

Abstract

Backgroud: Tea is the second most addictive worldwide after formulations containing caffeine in carbonated beverage. Green tea is made from leaves of the Camellia sinensis check for this species in other resources plant. In the repertoire of traditional Chinese medicine, green tea beverages have played a fundamental role associated with their culture. It has been suggested that green tea has a number of positive health benefits that are reviewed and discussed in this minireview.
Materials and Methods: We performed a search using the key words “green tea” AND “antiviral” covering the last 10 years. The consulted data based were PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge, Scopus, Reuters and Thomson.
Results: br The results of the searching greatly support that green tea presents both antibacterial and antiviral effects. The beneficial effects of green tea are mainly attributed to the presence of a type of polyphenols known as catechins and formed by several isomers including (-) - epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), (-) - epigallocatechin, (-) - epicatechin gallate, (-) -epicatechin, and (+) - catechin. The catechins in green tea have a wide range of antiviral activity against a variety of viruses that act by interfering with its replication cycle.
Conclusion: A detailed information on the antiviral activity of green tea in a number of different viruses show a promising future as a popular drink and also as a potential therapeutic agent.

Keywords
antiviral activity; Camellia sinensis; catechins; green tea; tea; virus

 
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